Author Topic: DM10 Expansion with Trigger I/O & ControlPad  (Read 60392 times)

Offline imattpeters

Re: DM10 Expansion with Trigger I/O & ControlPad
« Reply #100 on: September 05, 2015, 06:02:46 PM »
Hi,

I've installed the blue Jays sound set and now i don't seam to have any midi in function as described here.

I was able to do it before.

Is it possible a default setting got changed to off or does it just not work with blue jays?

Rgards

Offline the doctor

Re: DM10 Expansion with Trigger I/O & ControlPad
« Reply #101 on: December 30, 2015, 02:28:28 PM »
Can anyone tell me, how to connect two modules together, to use simultaneously on one kit?  My initial thought was to use a splitter on each pad/ cymbal.  I still need to have both headphone outputs go to one headphone set.  What about using midi, or a patch bay?

Offline TheGoshawk

Re: DM10 Expansion with Trigger I/O & ControlPad
« Reply #102 on: April 26, 2016, 07:01:43 PM »
Sorry if I'm going  somewhay out of main topic, but I'm quite desperate  :(
My DM10 Sound Module just broke because of a supply overvoltage and it doesn't work at all. So sad, so unlucky. I always used my DM10 Studio Kit with Superior Drummer via USB-Midi, so I nearly never used the on-board sounds of the DM10. So I am wondering if it makes sense to buy a DDrum DDTI instead of a more expensive DM10 module and to use it to send the Studio Kit trigger to Superior Drummer.
Does it make sense or you would go fo a new, expensive DM10 module even if I just need to send midi signals to the VST module?

I noticed that with DDrum DDTI one TRS input would be lacking, since the DDTI has 10 TRS + HH Control while the DM10 sends 11 trigger TRS + HH Control (because of the additional floor tom and the Ride 1 (A) + Ride 2 (B) plugs): is it possible to use only one TRS signal (output "A" from the ride pad) and thus use only the Ride main sound + bell, ignoring the choke?
Generally speaking, is there any issue in using the DDTI to capture and midi-send the DM10 triggers?

I read something about Alesis IO / DDrum DDTI latency, yet I had none with the DM10... could I expect the same with that modules?

Since the DM10 module is completely out-of-use I can't check the triggers: is there any possibility that the overvoltage (or short circuit) damaged the pads/cymbals too? Would it be possible to test them (even one by one) by connecting the Yamaha DTXplorer sound module of a friend of mine?

I really thank you for your replies and support... experiencing the DM10 stroke has been quite painful, since I adore the DM10 kit!
« Last Edit: April 27, 2016, 06:41:17 AM by TheGoshawk »

Offline Dartanbeck

Re: DM10 Expansion with Trigger I/O & ControlPad
« Reply #103 on: September 04, 2017, 03:59:53 PM »
... experiencing the DM10 stroke has been quite painful, since I adore the DM10 kit!
I'm a little late to the party (new here), but with that last statement... I'd have to recommend you getting your hands on another DM10 module. It truly is what it is!

This is a very cool thread.
I'm a new Alesis Drummer. I think I bought one of the last brand new DM 10 X Mesh kits before they completely disappeared (as a new purchase anyway) from the web marketplace, to be replaced by Crimson, Strike, and other new brethren.

I'm grateful for the timing of it... I really like this DM10 and already miss it being gone from the marketplace.

So I'm thinking that this thread's info will still work nearly the same with the newer lineup of Alesis stuff, like the SamplePad Pro and the SampleRack? I hope so.

I'm not planning a Monster kit just yet, but I am planning to get a SamplePad Pro and midi it into my DM10 so that I can use the DM10 samples with those extra pads. We'll see how that goes when the time comes.

Glad I've found this forum though... even though I am very late to the game ;)
Alesis DM10X Mesh

Offline Dartanbeck

Re: DM10 Expansion with Trigger I/O & ControlPad
« Reply #104 on: January 23, 2018, 12:45:48 PM »
Switching gears, since Alesis is being so generous with their entry-level offerings.

There are definitely some negative reviews about certain aspects of the DM10 kits. I bought my DM10X Mesh kit and haven't been experiencing many negatives, personally. I love it. Yes, it has some quirks but I think any e-drum or trigger situation is going to require some 'getting used to', and as I get used to setting up and playing my DM10, it just keeps getting better - and I've been gigging live with it since I got it, so it really has been getting put to the test - from me as well as from e-drum-negative audience folks. They all come up later saying how much they love my new drums!

Anyway, I was enjoying some fun videos from Justin at 65 Drums on YouTube, and was really enjoying his review of the Forge vs the Nitro kits by Alesis. He's looking at them from a perspective of buying these kits as the one kit - just the way he should. But I was watching from a perspective I've had after reading the first post in this thread - using any of these kits as an Add-on pack for my DM10 - main thought being to make use of some of the 35 extra midi notes in my DM10 module, the other being to just make use of the included module and run them both - especially in the case of the Forge, which adds the ability to play thumb-drive samples. If that turns out to be a great feature that works well live... use it along with some of the included sounds in the module.

    ----   Nitro (~$300USD)   ----        ----   Forge (~$500USD)   ----        ----   Command (~$700USD)   ----   



The DM10 module comes with so many sounds, I'd love to be able to trigger a LOT more of them within a single kit. Sample Pad Pro would still be awesome for using some of the great guitar and bass notes and use the new set of pads for pretty much any sound.

Having the extra rack makes for some great options towards making this monster kit - while also keeping it portable for the gigging drummer.

So, while I was pondering all of this, going between Guitar Center (since they also carry the elusive Crimson kit) and the video shoot-out, Alesis added two more kits (literally while I was refreshing the Alesis E-Drum page going back and forth between new and used kits) to the line-up:

Alesis Surge Mesh Kit - Kind of like a Nitro kit with DM10 mesh pads

Alesis Command Mesh Kit - looks like the same kit as above, but with the Forge/Command/Crimson/DM10MkII module with USB Sample support

--   Surge Mesh (~$500USD)   --  --   Command Mesh (~$700USD)   --  --   DM10MkII (~$1100USD)   --   



So this opens up a whole new realm of choice for all E-Drummers - new or vet or, like me, somewhere in between. Okay, I'm still very much a noob, but I know that I love the Alesis mesh pads and I really do love the sounds in the DM10 module - which seems kinda rare around here. 

My Singer is an amazing sound guy and my Guitarist is an amazing sound engineer. I get a really good sound straight through my headphones. These guys take it from there and make them thunder through the JBLs!   I'm currently looking into setting up either Addictive Drums 2 or Steven Slate Drums via MIDI/Laptop. We're going to do some of that no matter what. But my Singer told me to relax and take my time saving and observing... since they already sound so great live.

Not buying VST and an audio interface is enough savings to buy a whole new Alesis kit for use as an add-on pack for the DM10 (or whatever kit we might have)!!!
« Last Edit: January 23, 2018, 12:49:55 PM by Dartanbeck »
Alesis DM10X Mesh

Offline Hellfire

Re: DM10 Expansion with Trigger I/O & ControlPad
« Reply #105 on: January 23, 2018, 08:21:05 PM »
Keep in mind that in order to use the extra 35 midi notes of the (original) DM10 the device you are plugging into has to have the ability to change it's midi notes to match those available 35 notes. Just because a module has midi ports doesn't mean all midi option are available.

I'm pretty sure the Nitro is not able to do that. I'm not sure about the abilities of the Forge/Command/Crimson/DM10MkII/DM10MkIIPro. You will need to check the manuals of each module to see if you can change the midi note assignment of each trigger zone. If you can, then you should be able to do what you want (via midi linking/chaining). This is why this topic suggests using the Trigger I/O and or ControlPad and not just any drum module with a midi port.  ;)
« Last Edit: January 24, 2018, 12:38:30 PM by Hellfire »
For more edrum info, be sure to visit my web site at:
          www.HellfireDrums.com                    
My current set-up:  Alesis DM10 and Trigger I/O with modified & DIY pads

Offline Dartanbeck

Re: DM10 Expansion with Trigger I/O & ControlPad
« Reply #106 on: January 24, 2018, 04:13:54 PM »
Wow... good thing I posted then... I was under the impression we could just assign them inside the DM10.

Thanks for saving me, Hellfire!

Now, even still... the price of a Nitro still makes for a very inexpensive way to add a pile of triggers and hardware. Of course, the reason this might be an option for someone like me is that the triggers (most of them) would be used to access those sounds that I don't use all the time, but would like to use during various times at gigs - so these extra pads aren't going to be going through the same abuse as my usual drums and cymbals.

So a Trigger I/O (now sold via dDrum) would likely be needed. Gotcha. Thank you so much.
Alesis DM10X Mesh

Offline Hellfire

Re: DM10 Expansion with Trigger I/O & ControlPad
« Reply #107 on: January 24, 2018, 05:37:42 PM »
... I was under the impression we could just assign them inside the DM10.
Yes, some of the "zones" in the DM10 can use different midi note assignments but, a midi note number is just that. Meaning midi note#35 is always midi note #35. You can't change that or else it's not midi note #35 anymore and the extra notes in the DM10 are just that. Notes and have fixed numbers. You can however assign any of the DM10 sounds to that extra midi notes and then trigger them via an external midi device (which is exactly what this topic is all about).

The truth is, this is a very advanced technique of using the DM10. You really need a good understand of midi just to set this up.

Now, even still... the price of a Nitro still makes for a very inexpensive way to add a pile of triggers and hardware. Of course, the reason this might be an option for someone like me is that the triggers (most of them) would be used to access those sounds that I don't use all the time, but would like to use during various times at gigs - so these extra pads aren't going to be going through the same abuse as my usual drums and cymbals.

So a Trigger I/O (now sold via dDrum) would likely be needed. Gotcha. Thank you so much.

FYI, if you don't mind the sounds of the other drum module you can always just use an audio mixer and combine the two audio outputs of the different modules and still make your monster kit. You would just be using the sounds of both module at that point. This is a common way of combining two or more modules without messing around with MIDI.
For more edrum info, be sure to visit my web site at:
          www.HellfireDrums.com                    
My current set-up:  Alesis DM10 and Trigger I/O with modified & DIY pads

Offline Seforeman

Re: DM10 Expansion with Trigger I/O & ControlPad
« Reply #108 on: January 26, 2018, 06:40:25 AM »
Is there any kind of hardware available to mount the control pad (Alesis) to the frame of the DM10 Pro kit?

I mounted mine by using the top of a snare stand - the snare basket. And mounted it to the rack - works perfect.

Stu

Offline Dartanbeck

Re: DM10 Expansion with Trigger I/O & ControlPad
« Reply #109 on: January 27, 2018, 02:33:29 AM »
A midi note number is just that. Meaning midi note#35 is always midi note #35. You can't change that or else it's not midi note #35 anymore and the extra notes in the DM10 are just that. Notes and have fixed numbers. You can however assign any of the DM10 sounds to that extra midi notes and then trigger them via an external midi device (which is exactly what this topic is all about).

The truth is, this is a very advanced technique of using the DM10. You really need a good understand of midi just to set this up.
Okay, so the assigning of the midi note numbers is done in the TMI coming into MIDI IN, right?
Alesis DM10X Mesh

Offline Dartanbeck

Re: DM10 Expansion with Trigger I/O & ControlPad
« Reply #110 on: January 27, 2018, 02:38:08 AM »
FYI, if you don't mind the sounds of the other drum module you can always just use an audio mixer and combine the two audio outputs of the different modules and still make your monster kit. You would just be using the sounds of both module at that point. This is a common way of combining two or more modules without messing around with MIDI.
...and in some situations I'd be fine with that, but I would love to trigger some of the amazing sounds of the DM10 that I don't have included in my standard kit, like the guitars, FX, extra percussion... the works.
Alesis DM10X Mesh

Offline Hellfire

Re: DM10 Expansion with Trigger I/O & ControlPad
« Reply #111 on: January 27, 2018, 08:32:20 AM »
A midi note number is just that. Meaning midi note#35 is always midi note #35. You can't change that or else it's not midi note #35 anymore and the extra notes in the DM10 are just that. Notes and have fixed numbers. You can however assign any of the DM10 sounds to that extra midi notes and then trigger them via an external midi device (which is exactly what this topic is all about).

The truth is, this is a very advanced technique of using the DM10. You really need a good understand of midi just to set this up.
Okay, so the assigning of the midi note numbers is done in the TMI coming into MIDI IN, right?


The MIDI IN of the DM10, Yes. You would use the MIDI OUT of the TMI (or drum module that has the ability to change it's midi note numbers of a given trigger input).

You also need to make sure that both the module and the TMI are set to the same midi channel. In most midi drum equipment the default is already set to Midi Channel 10, but it is always a good idea to check this when putting together your set up.

I can sense your excitement with this topic and I'm starting to get the feeling that you haven't used midi much. I would highly recommend that you look into reading up on basic midi and how it works. Google is your friend when it comes to stuff like this. Once you do that, it will open up a large world of possibilities and you will be glad you did.  ;)
For more edrum info, be sure to visit my web site at:
          www.HellfireDrums.com                    
My current set-up:  Alesis DM10 and Trigger I/O with modified & DIY pads

Offline Dartanbeck

Re: DM10 Expansion with Trigger I/O & ControlPad
« Reply #112 on: January 27, 2018, 03:33:29 PM »
I can sense your excitement with this topic and I'm starting to get the feeling that you haven't used midi much. I would highly recommend that you look into reading up on basic midi and how it works. Google is your friend when it comes to stuff like this. Once you do that, it will open up a large world of possibilities and you will be glad you did.  ;)
Very interested. In fact, back in the 90's when I worked at Guitar Center, Tama gave me one of the first consumer-level Tama Cage to display. Thing was awesome!

The whole right side was a new flagship Tama kit with Zildjian, Sabian, and Paiste galore... it was a thing of beauty!
The left side was one of these Pearl electronic drum kits, which were pretty cool at the time they came out

For the Pearl's bass drum pad, I used a Snare sound, the rest of the pads were a really nice electric bass sample - all done via MIDI.

Overhead I had a Roland Octapad, and back then I don't think they came with any sounds - just a midi controller - I could be wrong... it was a long time ago and I was pretty wild back then. But I used an amazing muted violin sample of all of the notes needed to play "Still of the Night" by Whitesnake.

Pro Sound helped my with the midi stuff and surrounded the kit with top-notch PA gear and the Guitar department gave me a foot pedal for effects for the muted violin sound between the sound module and the PA, so I could make it scream or behave.

The final deal was a mic arm coming down from above (Tama Cage was amazing!!!) with a SM58 Beta. I was surrounded with really nice monitors and they had JBLs facing out all the way around the stage and a hexagon... it was so cool!

To demo the thing, I played and sang Still of the Night by Whitesnake all by myself. Right foot on Tama acoustic bass drum, left on the Pearl e-pad snare, using a high-end sample. Left hand going between acoustic drums and cymbals and the bass parts of the song, right hand strumming the muted violin as a guitar and filling in the drums and cymbals, alternating with the left to get it all filled in. Both hands flying back and forth between bass and guitar during the cool guitar solo of the song... people would scream out loud like they were at a concert! It was so fun!
 
  an example image of the Tama Cage filled with drums


Now keep in mind, drummers were scared and pissed at this time. Drum machines were really pretty good. I think it was the Roland 707 or something like that, Alesis came out with an amazing alternative, Casio was making some really inventive and really quite decent drum machines and samplers... drums felt threatened. Well... not all of us - but there was that general aura going on.

So this Caged Kit demo was a real message being send to these drummers from a drummer and the industry backing the drummers, that we can replace musicians too. There is no threat - just options.
Alesis DM10X Mesh

Offline Dartanbeck

Re: DM10 Expansion with Trigger I/O & ControlPad
« Reply #113 on: January 27, 2018, 03:45:13 PM »
I did set up the sounds for that kit via midi, but I had help - and that was a long time ago. So, yeah... I better do some digging.

I remember it being really cool, though. They were all those old LED type displays back then (on midi boxes) and we just use the arrow and center buttons to navigate, select, and tweak. Once one gets going, it really becomes a sort of second nature.

We had a warehouse and demo rooms filled with high-end gear. E-drums were not selling very well, but we were lucky to be Guitar Center, we supplied the high-end clients who needed their gear! I'm failing to remember the top competition drum pads setup... Dyna-something... I was hoping Google could help but I've had no luck. I thought it was Dynomark, but I'm not seeing anything for that.

There was an amazing jazz musician who played those, and helped us tweak out a demo of the kit in the store. All midi.

We had Simmons and Roland too... That Pearl kit just came to us one day - so I set it up. But nobody was buying them then. We sold a few, enough to keep restocking them, but we had Fred Gretsch much busier making shells than the plastics corps! LOL

It was a different world then, though.

I still get assaulted with comments about not playing 'real' drums anymore, but nothing like it would have been back then - unless we were in a techno joint. I just tell people that (referring to my DM10X Mesh pads) these ARE real drums. They just have their mics built in ;)
Alesis DM10X Mesh

Offline Dartanbeck

Re: DM10 Expansion with Trigger I/O & ControlPad
« Reply #114 on: January 27, 2018, 04:04:22 PM »
To help get (re)started in MIDI, I did a quick search and found MIDI.org (MIDI Association) which has a wealth of information and articles.
click image to go there


Just putting this up here in case anyone else is interested.
Here is their Getting Started article, which is their recommended place to start for either newcomers to MIDI, or those whom simply wish to brush up on the basics.

The actual site has many, many articles, specs, history, stories, ideas... all around MIDI and how it works/how we work with it. They even offer a non-linear education courses Certification program for those wishing to become educated and certified in various MIDI curriculum!
« Last Edit: January 27, 2018, 04:06:21 PM by Dartanbeck »
Alesis DM10X Mesh

Offline Dartanbeck

Re: DM10 Expansion with Trigger I/O & ControlPad
« Reply #115 on: January 27, 2018, 05:16:40 PM »
To help get (re)started in MIDI, I did a quick search and found MIDI.org (MIDI Association) which has a wealth of information and articles.
click image to go there


Just putting this up here in case anyone else is interested.
Here is their Getting Started article, which is their recommended place to start for either newcomers to MIDI, or those whom simply wish to brush up on the basics.

The actual site has many, many articles, specs, history, stories, ideas... all around MIDI and how it works/how we work with it. They even offer a non-linear education courses Certification program for those wishing to become educated and certified in various MIDI curriculum!
In case you went to Getting Started and wasn't sure what to do next (it kinda seems confusing at first), those preliminary articles appear to be recent development-like articles which fit as primers to all of this. Wanting to just "Get Started", I didn't read those first. I want to get a better understanding first, so I kept scrolling and going to the NEXT page, etc.,

Notice how, after each individual article snippet there's a "Continue Reading" link. Clicking those will send you to that specific article or landing page of grouped articles, etc.,

So I kept going until I found the Introduction to MIDI and clicked on that one, which leads HERE, a page full of downloadable pdf articles on the subject of an Introduction to MIDI.
Alesis DM10X Mesh

Offline Dartanbeck

Re: DM10 Expansion with Trigger I/O & ControlPad
« Reply #116 on: January 27, 2018, 06:10:41 PM »
I'd also like to add:
If you've never used (or realized that you were using) MIDI and, upon a glance decide that it's just too darned geeky to get into, I urge you to reconsider.

Yeah, the creation of MIDI and its rules makes for some really geeky reading. If it seems a bit overwhelming, don't let it be so. Let anything just go over your head and just keep going. When it comes to MIDI, in many cases that over-the-head stuff will either make sense later or at least make more sense when/if you realize you need to go back and read it again - you'll know when/if that time arises. You will.

Musical Instrument Digital Interface, in my (currently) limited understanding is a language set about to allow, as it says, musical instruments to communicate digitally. It sends velocity, note and timing information and is designed from the start to give only the required information necessary so that that information can be sent SO FAST that it feels instantaneous - because to humans, it really is.

The topic of this thread begins with the information that we DM10 module owners have an additional 35 MIDI notes to play with, beyond the 22 (varies with different set versions, I suppose) being used by the triggers that came with the kit.

Knowing how many sounds we have available to use via each drum, rim, cymbal, etc., already... the thought of more than doubling that is pretty cool. Of course, it'll take some know-how to get at all of them - even just any of them, I guess. That's where knowing a bit how MIDI works will come into play.

On this topic, I don't think it's required to become a Certified Master in the field to get what you need from it. We really just need to know to send MIDI OUT from another interface, whose outgoing notes can be assigned to the notes available within the DM10 Module, to the MIDI IN of the DM10 Module.

That's the simple part - just a MIDI cable going from the one interface's MIDI OUT to the DM10 Module's MIDI IN.

In the old days I speak of a few posts up, MIDI was getting popular and was more of an in-your-face type of notion on the modules (like sound modules to be controlled by a MIDI keyboard, guitar, drum, or something else) since we didn't really have it taken care of for us auto-magically behind the scenes as we really kind of have it now. Nowadays we're almost all using MIDI whether we realize it or not. But back then, setting the MIDI NOTE value was just one of the parameters we had. Today, just seeing that something has the MIDI IN and OUT jacks doesn't necessarily mean that it will allow us to change values of triggers MIDI NOTE.

This is where it's nice that most major companies allow us to download the User's Manual to products before buying them. Just look up the MIDI section in the manual. Unless you're getting something specifically made to work intimately with MIDI, it's likely that the MIDI information section of the manual will be short.

If it never gives a clear indication as to whether each trigger's MIDI NOTE can be set manually, yet you're really hoping to use this particular product, I'd advise contacting their support team and/or their forum and finding out for sure first.

General MIDI is a set of rules (if I understand correctly) that manufacturers must (their best interests in mind) obey in order to use MIDI with their product. This is a good thing. If Roland's "A" was "32F" on Yamaha, it would quickly become something that no longer means anything to anyone. "It has MIDI" - "Who cares"

So according to the rules, the DM10 module is using MIDI Channel 10. 10 is for Drums. I'm fairly certain that MIDI boxes meant to be used with Keys and other devices are also capable of accessing the Drum channel, but it might be good to just check that before going for something not made to work with Drum Triggers and the like.

DAW are really cool in how they let us grab MIDI information and drag it around, alter it and even automate procedures to even out imperfections in timing - or even the other way around to add a more human feel.

But we're all drummers here, right? Drummers or drum owners. That said, I think it's fair to assume that we all know who Neil Peart is, right? Let's think about him for a bit, just as an example.

So imagine Neil Peart as you sit behind your un-modified DM10 kit. The Professor had a lot more stuff to play, didn't he? More drums, chimes, bells...  In all actuality, even with those extra 35 MIDI notes we wouldn't be able to fill out our DM10 to match his - but we could get a LOT closer, and without having to stop using our convenient Stereo Outputs and our own headphone jack.

Without having to resort to adding more stuff via MIDI, we can add one more trigger pad (DM10X). That's not enough to make a YYZ kit, is it? No.

With an interface that's set up to allow the user to set the MIDI Note Number of each individual SEND, we can gain as many of those extra 35 NOTES as that new interface allows. What's happening is: the triggers we plug into the new interface get renamed (a number) to something the DM10 module will recognize as a completely new part of the kit - something we can assign sounds to, just like any of the other pads we're already using.

In the DM10 module, we'll know these new trigger by a number instead of a convenient name - but once we have the sounds we want assigned to each NOTE, the names of the sounds will clue us in as to which trigger we're looking at in the module.

Adding three extra tom drums can be huge to a live drummer. It immediately makes songs like YYZ a lot easier to play. Adding three more cymbals is a boon to any drummer - even just one new cymbal is enough to make me happy!

Okay so if we start small with what I've just said, that's six of those thirty-five available NOTES. Can you already start to see how it's not going to be a game changer if the interface we get can only give us 12 more triggers available? That would still give us eight tuned bells, two timbale and two conga, for example. Or three timpani, four guitar crunches and five bass notes.

So when Hellfire's talking about getting access to 20 of those 35 NOTEs with one interface, and that we'd need a special piece of equipment to gain the last 15 - or whatever... please take a moment to understand how powerful just adding 15 more triggers to an already impressive drum kit can be!

..and that it's MIDI that can take us there.

Yeah, I'm probably over-simplifying things here. It can sound easier in my head as I'm typing this that it might actually be in practice. But the point is the same. Try not to get put-off by using MIDI just because learning it always starts off with stuff that sounds like you're about to learn how the Universe works. Try not to just skip over all of that either. But if it wants to go over your head for now, just let it go over. If you want to turn back around and get a firm grasp... go head. I'm just saying that you don't really have to. It'll come back when you have enough treats in your hand to tease it back!
« Last Edit: January 27, 2018, 06:36:50 PM by Dartanbeck »
Alesis DM10X Mesh

Offline Dartanbeck

Re: DM10 Expansion with Trigger I/O & ControlPad
« Reply #117 on: January 27, 2018, 06:58:35 PM »
Note: The Alesis Trigger I/O is no longer available through Alesis (already mentioned earlier in thread) but is now Red and is sold under a new name by ddrum.

Note in this image, the options just left of the readout. The very bottom parameter is TRIG MIDI NOTE #, allowing us to set out triggers according to Hellfire's wonderful map! ;)

Alesis DM10X Mesh

Offline Dartanbeck

Re: DM10 Expansion with Trigger I/O & ControlPad
« Reply #118 on: January 27, 2018, 07:09:42 PM »
Hmmm... I couldn't help but notice that, toward the end of the first page of this thread, Yeshai had an interesting (and unfortunate?) situation that really bums me out about the newer line-up of Alesis kits (not incl. Strike kits):

He started to explain that he bought a DM10, a Trigger I/O, and a DM6 USB.

The unfortunate thing in these situations is that we'd either need to buy all new TRS cables for the DM6 USB, or cut the cable snake connector off the end and put stereo plugs on the ends of each stereo pairing.   :-\

Or am I wrong in this? In thinking this another way, can we MIDI OUT from another module, say the DM6 USB into the Trigger I/O and change the trigger Notes in the I/O and MIDI OUT from the Trigger I/O to the DM10?

The only other savior in this situation is if the DM6 USB module offers the ability to alter the MIDI NOTES of each trigger SEND
Alesis DM10X Mesh

Offline Chaser

Re: DM10 Expansion with Trigger I/O & ControlPad
« Reply #119 on: January 27, 2018, 09:21:10 PM »
Hmmm... I couldn't help but notice that, toward the end of the first page of this thread, Yeshai had an interesting (and unfortunate?) situation that really bums me out about the newer line-up of Alesis kits (not incl. Strike kits):

He started to explain that he bought a DM10, a Trigger I/O, and a DM6 USB.

The unfortunate thing in these situations is that we'd either need to buy all new TRS cables for the DM6 USB, or cut the cable snake connector off the end and put stereo plugs on the ends of each stereo pairing.   :-\

Or am I wrong in this? In thinking this another way, can we MIDI OUT from another module, say the DM6 USB into the Trigger I/O and change the trigger Notes in the I/O and MIDI OUT from the Trigger I/O to the DM10?

The only other savior in this situation is if the DM6 USB module offers the ability to alter the MIDI NOTES of each trigger SEND

The Trigger IO/DDTi do not have midi in or thru..

So when Hellfire's talking about getting access to 20 of those 35 NOTEs with one interface, and that we'd need a special piece of equipment to gain the last 15 - or whatever... please take a moment to understand how powerful just adding 15 more triggers to an already impressive drum kit can be!

If you are looking to add more triggers to use all the extra 35 notes in the DM10..then use 2X Trigger IO/DDTi (20 zones EA),and a midi merge box going into the DM10.
http://www.midisolutions.com/products.htm

A lot of modules/TMI you can't do much to the Hi hat as far as note assignments..but in the TriggerIO/DDTi  you can also assign notes to the hi hat input and pedal down.
You can also access 21 different kit mappings/presets in the TriggerIO/DDTi from the front panel.(I believe with a foot switch also.)

TriggerIO user guide pg 17
"When using a hi-hat pedal connected to the Hi-hat pedal input on the Trigger IO, the
Hi-hat input (Input 3) can send two different MIDI Notes, depending on the position of
the Hi-hat pedal. In effect, this allows you to assign two different notes for the hi-hat
input (Input 3) and with the pedal toggle between which note the hi-hat trigger
sending. In addition, you can also assign another MIDI Note Number to the pedal
down position of the pedal"

DDTi also pg 17
When using a hi-hat pedal connected to the Hi-hat pedal input on the DDTi, the Hi-hat input (Input 3) can send two different MIDI Notes, depending on the position of the Hi-hat pedal. In effect, this allows you to assign two different notes for the hi-hat input (Input 3) and with the pedal toggle between which note the hi-hat trigger sending. In addition, you can also assign another MIDI Note Number to the pedal down position of the pedal.

Here is the links to the reference manuals for the TriggerIO and the DDTi for the most part they are the same..I don't know of any differences between the 2 modules..
The TriggerIO links provided here under Drum Modules/Machines have changed since Alesis did all their website changes
http://alesis.com/products/view/triggerio
http://www.ddrum.com/manuals
« Last Edit: January 27, 2018, 10:52:47 PM by Chaser »

Offline rhysT

Re: DM10 Expansion with Trigger I/O & ControlPad
« Reply #120 on: January 27, 2018, 10:32:06 PM »
The Tama cage kit would be fun to play on, although I'd prefer my compact DM10 setup with some expansion multipads and synth to trigger more variety of instrument sounds.

Btw, the DM10's guitar and other musical sounds (or Hits) are limited to being assigned in the Sequencer accompaniment Hit groups. I'll provide some more info in a separate Sequencer topic.
« Last Edit: January 27, 2018, 11:13:08 PM by rhysT »

Offline Dartanbeck

Re: DM10 Expansion with Trigger I/O & ControlPad
« Reply #121 on: January 27, 2018, 11:50:23 PM »
rhysT, is that your DM10 setup there in the pic? Sweet rig!!!

You aren't kidding about that Cage! They never sold that well. I mean... they sold (just not often) but they require a crew or days. They are even more massive than they look in pictures. All of us, in this forum, could stand on, and hang from it at once and it would be solid... totally solid!

Yeah... I love my portable DM10!!!

I want to get one of those new kits with all 8" mesh pads (I have the X Mesh kit) and maybe a Nitro with the rubber pads and, like Chaser says, a pair of the Trigger I/O and that Merge Box. Use the mesh pads for additional drums and the rubber pads and extra cymbals for additional sounds I can stash around the kit.

As Chaser also pointed out (and I just found out myself earlier today) that the Trigger I/O can accept and use the extra HiHat pedals I'd get, so I can have multiple hats stashed around as well - and use the extra kicks for entirely different sounds that I can play with my feet.

Then use the racks that come with them to expand mine to accommodate it all. It's cool how mine currently folds up so nice and fits on top of the two wide, flat cases that hold the rest of the kit. It really transports nice!

Also... I've played some really nice guitar sounds using my pads one day when I was experimenting. When you say "reserved for Sequencer", do you know how to record new sequences to save onto the module? Maybe that's already a thread here somewhere?

Also, thanks for turning me on to this forum again! Such a HUGE help!!!
Alesis DM10X Mesh

Offline rhysT

Re: DM10 Expansion with Trigger I/O & ControlPad
« Reply #122 on: January 28, 2018, 05:48:56 AM »
rhysT, is that your DM10 setup there in the pic? Sweet rig!!!

Also... I've played some really nice guitar sounds using my pads one day when I was experimenting. When you say "reserved for Sequencer", do you know how to record new sequences to save onto the module? Maybe that's already a thread here somewhere?

Yeah that's a kit layout I've tried using the Korg synth's drum kits and arpeggiators to add some variety.

After checking the the Guitar Jam kit I realize the Hit sounds can be assigned to the DM10 pads, whereas the Hit Groups are dedicated to the sequencer accompaniments, so ignore my previous error. Refer to the DM10 O/m (p18) for info about recording or editing sequences.

Btw, the Tama cage reminded me of this cool rig: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xJnDrNMXt5M
« Last Edit: January 28, 2018, 05:52:13 AM by rhysT »

Offline Dartanbeck

Re: DM10 Expansion with Trigger I/O & ControlPad
« Reply #123 on: January 28, 2018, 12:16:07 PM »
Sweet Kit!!! Thanks for that!

Yeah, I read the manual. It doesn't mention tips on recording the accompaniment via external controller. Maybe when I get to that stage I'll start a thread on it.

Wow, those Korg pads... how are those for live playing? Do they work well with sticks or are they for fingers? Also, how do you like your Yamaha trigger pads? Looks sweet, man!
Alesis DM10X Mesh