Author Topic: Acoustic set to electronic conversion  (Read 394 times)

Offline doggyd69b

Acoustic set to electronic conversion
« on: April 10, 2019, 01:19:34 PM »
I have been building my dream set for years now, I started with 4 mismatched toms that I bought at a pawn shop in Virginia back in 2008, I cut two of the toms in half, added my bass drum from my regular acoustic set, I made mesh heads using the rims form old mylar heads and window mesh (2 ply) I used Pintech triggers and my DIY trigger holders, for cymbals I used a set of 5 pintech cymbals (single zone) and for the pedal (HH) I used the Roland FD7 I believe, for the module I used the Alesis DM5, for monitors I used 2 JBL 10 inch active speakers. It worked great for what it was but I soon after discovered software... I then bought Steven Slate drums and an Alesis I/O. Around the same time I discovered pet proof mesh, and replaced the mesh heads with that mesh, the only one that I bought was the bass drum head ( a Hart Dynamic mesh head) only because it is pretty hard to get a 22 inch DIY mesh head with the correct tension. The setup sounded incredible with the software, I was only wishing the HH was better....
Fast forward 4 years to 2012 when I bougtht a Roland TD-11, of course it worked great, but I missed the feeling of the mesh pads, I used it for a few years ( I still have it), I saw a gibraltar rack with over 15 cymbal attachments for $200, I had to drive 2 hrs to get it but it was well worht it, later I also saw a 7 piece acoustic set for sale on FB for $300, it was in great shape and I could not pass that up so I bought it. The set sounds great acoustic but i found it way too loud! funny how all the years of playing electronic drums spoil you, mind you, I have played acoustic sets since the early 90s... this time with more disposable income (and time) I decided to have a go at converting that set to electronic. I bought Remo Silentstroke heads minus the bass drum head that I had from before. I bought a 2 zone Roland snare trigger and a Roland bass trigger, and I bought the DDrum Redshot triggers for the toms, I had initially done my own bridge system but the piezos ended up being way to sensitive and for $60, I was able to have triggers on all the toms that just work perfectly, so now the current setup is 5 toms, snare and bass, and 7 cymbals all of it connected to the Roland Module with the exception of the 5th tom ( that module only allows for 4 toms  :-\). the 5th tom is connected to the DM5, both module outputs are connected to a behringer small mixer and the output of the mixer is connected to a headphone amplifier which gives me 4 outputs (one for my headphones and 3 for cameras when recording drum covers).  The whole point of this is that I didn't give up on the dream and yes it took me years before I had the time, but slowly I upgraded things until I got mostly what I want, that NO Roland kit will even come close to!. Now If I can only save enough to get the Strike module, (or any other module that can be loaded with your own sounds, then no computer will be needed and you have a great sounding kit that in the end is less than $3000 but sounds way better than Any other kit... My final point is that DIY is great for those who want to play but don't have the $$ or resources, it gets you there quicker, but the idea is to upgrade things until you have the perfect kit for you. Look in FB, Ebay, Craigslist, I saw a roland kit with 5 10 inch pads and module given for Free!! I was too slow to respond so someone else got it, but there are always deals to be had. don't give up on your dream because of a few things go wrong, it's only part of the fun!!

Offline Iggford

Re: Acoustic set to electronic conversion
« Reply #1 on: April 11, 2019, 02:50:06 PM »
I have been playing electronic drums since 2001, with my purchase of a Roland TD-6.  I used it to play at home, and every now and then I'd carry it to a friend's house to jam.  I lost it in a fire in 2008, and my wife surprised me with another one about a month after the fire.  It was an upgraded version with the mesh snare.  I joined my first (and only, so far) band in 2015 with that kit. 

I upgraded to an Alesis DM10 Studio Mesh kit in February of 2016, after we had played out twice.  That kit took a beating, and still does in practice.  I keep it at our bandleader's house for practice, because I upgraded again to a Strike Pro in February of 2018.  I carry the module back and forth for our rehearsals.  I absolutely love the kit, and the module is nothing short of amazing!  I have incorporated a few of my old Roland pads into it to expand it out a bit. 

I have had an interest in picking up an acoustic kit.  I honestly don't know if I'd leave it acoustic or convert it, though, so chances are I might have to pick up two!  The band I'm in now is strictly electronic, so it would be really cool to DIY something from an acoustic set.  Although, if I'm ever in another band, it would be nice to have the option of acoustic or electronic. 

I have much respect for the guys that build their kits from the ground up.  I hope to join those ranks one day!


--
Shawn.

Offline rhysT

Re: Acoustic set to electronic conversion
« Reply #2 on: April 12, 2019, 08:03:33 AM »
Here's another option for acoustic/electronic kit conversion: http://nfuzdaudio.com/international/community/about-nfuzd/
« Last Edit: April 12, 2019, 05:18:06 PM by rhysT »

Offline doggyd69b

Re: Acoustic set to electronic conversion
« Reply #3 on: April 12, 2019, 10:38:29 AM »
I have been playing electronic drums since 2001, with my purchase of a Roland TD-6.  I used it to play at home, and every now and then I'd carry it to a friend's house to jam.  I lost it in a fire in 2008, and my wife surprised me with another one about a month after the fire.  It was an upgraded version with the mesh snare.  I joined my first (and only, so far) band in 2015 with that kit. 

I upgraded to an Alesis DM10 Studio Mesh kit in February of 2016, after we had played out twice.  That kit took a beating, and still does in practice.  I keep it at our bandleader's house for practice, because I upgraded again to a Strike Pro in February of 2018.  I carry the module back and forth for our rehearsals.  I absolutely love the kit, and the module is nothing short of amazing!  I have incorporated a few of my old Roland pads into it to expand it out a bit. 

I have had an interest in picking up an acoustic kit.  I honestly don't know if I'd leave it acoustic or convert it, though, so chances are I might have to pick up two!  The band I'm in now is strictly electronic, so it would be really cool to DIY something from an acoustic set.  Although, if I'm ever in another band, it would be nice to have the option of acoustic or electronic. 

I have much respect for the guys that build their kits from the ground up.  I hope to join those ranks one day!


--
Shawn.


Sorry to hear about the fire, i'm glad your family is ok.
The only reason to convert an acoustic set if you already have a good electronic set will be for looks, (and in some cases to have full size snare, and toms (and bass) so in other words more playing surface and a more natural setup than what you get with small electronic pads.,  For an example check out this guys setup :

https://www.youtube.com/user/SiREN2173  (When I grow up I want to be like him)  ;D

If you are interested in converting an acoustic set, the cheapest and easiest option is to buy mesh heads (Remo silentstroke are not that bad but there are other brands available including Roland which is NOT cheap), get external triggers, (DDrum Red Shot are very cheap at $15 each), and keep your electronic cymbals and your strike module of course, now if you want to be able to switch back and forth from electronic to acoustic, also buy a pack of acoustic cymbals and regular drum heads, that way you can go back to acoustic anytime you need to. this particular pack seems to be very decent bang for the buck:

https://www.amazon.com/Meinl-Ultimate-Cymbal-Trash-Crash/dp/B00QYUVO0U/ref=sr_1_9?crid=6SPNPDIPA044&keywords=meinl+cymbal+pack&qid=1555079330&s=gateway&sprefix=meinl+%2Caps%2C267&sr=8-9

However you might, like me, discover that after playing electronic sets for so long, now you find acoustic sets way too loud... it happens to some of us, and I have played acoustic for over 25 years!  I have only been playing electronics for about 5....

I hope I'm not breaking any rules posting links (Sorry Hellfire) I just wanted to help a drummer brother.

Offline Iggford

Re: Acoustic set to electronic conversion
« Reply #4 on: April 16, 2019, 11:34:25 AM »
Thanks for the info! 

Yeah, I haven't played acoustic in 20 years, so I don't know how I would react to it.  I never really thought about it, though.  The band community that I'm a part of is pretty mixed, so I'm around both all the time, but I know there's a difference actually sitting behind the kit. 

It would mostly be for looks, but I already have a Strike Pro, so I have the larger pads to begin with.  I think my main wish is to convert an acoustic kick.  That way the kit would at least have that full size kick to go along with everything else.

Thanks again for the information!


--
Shawn

Offline doggyd69b

Re: Acoustic set to electronic conversion
« Reply #5 on: April 16, 2019, 01:14:04 PM »
if you want to convert just the kick, you can get the Aquarian e bass drum patch for about $ 40

https://www.amazon.com/Aquarian-Kickzone-Bass-Drum-Trigger/dp/B00AWKGX36/ref=sr_1_fkmr0_1?keywords=aquarian+electronic+bass+drum+patch&qid=1555432878&s=gateway&sr=8-1-fkmr0

 or you can get the Roland DD A22 for $319 (yes it's not cheap, but you will be hard pressed to find a better funtioning trigger at that price point. another option is the Axis E-kits, there is a company that sells similar kits but for other pedal brands, since the sensor is not on the drum but beside the pedal being hit by a small hammer, it makes it really accurate and not prone to double triggering like other drum mounted sensors... Option options...

Offline iCe

Re: Acoustic set to electronic conversion
« Reply #6 on: April 27, 2019, 07:19:53 AM »
Here is a quick pic of my current setup. I converted my Pearl Vision VBA kit to an electronic kit. I use the 'old' DM10 brain as a midi device that connects to my pc, on which i run Superior Drummer 3. Obviously the sounds blow the DM10 stock sounds away, but even when i use just the DM10 i'm amazed about how great this kit feels. Way better then my DM10 with the mesh head conversion i did. I did go all the way and got triggers for the Zildjian L80's, so my 'custom' kit is complete! I can now record and play without annoying the neighbors or my fiancee :p
Alesis DM10 Studio kit with 682drums mesh heads
Asus F551MAV-BING-SX1008B - Laptop

Offline Iggford

Re: Acoustic set to electronic conversion
« Reply #7 on: April 29, 2019, 11:02:39 AM »
What triggers did you use for your L80s?  I've been thinking about getting a set of them and a set of triggers.  I already have a set of Gen16s, but I still need 3 more cymbals to round out the kit.  The L80 sets are a much less expensive purchase than another set of Gen16s, plus I already have the Gen16 brain.  I wasn't really happy with the sound from the Gen16 crash and ride, thus my investigation into the triggered route. 

Acoustically, how are the L80s?  I gig with my Strike kit, and the band I'm in was built around an all-electronic setup for volume control.  The bandleader was skeptical of my Gen16s, but was ok with them once I used them during a show.  While I don't use the crash and ride, I have consistently continued to use the hi-hat, and once I got the balance worked out in the mix, the acoustic noise isn't really a concern.  Just wondering if I'd have the same result from the L80 set.


--
Shawn