Author Topic: Mod the switch on the cymbals?  (Read 480 times)

Offline korakios

Mod the switch on the cymbals?
« on: June 20, 2018, 11:03:40 PM »
Has anyone ever moded the switch on the cymbals ? I am mostly interested for the bell switch .
Itís hard to activate it and was thinking for a hardware mod to make it trigger easily.

Offline ironman187

Re: Mod the switch on the cymbals?
« Reply #1 on: June 21, 2018, 07:05:29 PM »
This place seems kinda dead at the moment, but it might actually be a module setting. What cymbal and module do you have?

Offline korakios

Re: Mod the switch on the cymbals?
« Reply #2 on: June 21, 2018, 08:56:40 PM »
DM10 module, for sure itís not some setting , itís pure hardware mod ;)

Offline ironman187

Re: Mod the switch on the cymbals?
« Reply #3 on: June 21, 2018, 11:29:54 PM »
It could very well be a sensitivity ( or possibly a crosstalk) issue. I highly recommend adjusting the sensitivity, re-trigger, and threshold settings before trying to mod the cymbal. Here's a good place to start. https://youtu.be/xQOZ9orkO00

Offline korakios

Re: Mod the switch on the cymbals?
« Reply #4 on: June 22, 2018, 02:02:52 AM »
Thanks @ironman187 :)
But still I want to try a hardware mod , making the bell (or edge) triggered easily, even by letting the stick bounce lightly .

Offline Hellfire

Re: Mod the switch on the cymbals?
« Reply #5 on: June 22, 2018, 08:41:27 AM »
Thanks @ironman187 :)
But still I want to try a hardware mod , making the bell (or edge) triggered easily, even by letting the stick bounce lightly .

The best thing about DIY is finding out. Just because no one is saying anything about it doesn't mean it can't be done. The truth is very few people ever attempt true DIY with edrums. Heck, most users never ever program their own kit.

The best advice I can give you is, learn how the switch works and is made. This can help with formulating your plan of attack. Sometime insight from other DIY projects can help. Have you ever seen this DIY choke switch article from 2007?:

Get a Choke Hold (eCymbal Choke Switch)

Just keep in mind that the best response to a trigger is always going to come from a piezo triggered zone. A switch always has a certain amount of minimal mechanical force that is necessary to close a switch. That is why edges of cymbal and bells of cymbal tend to use this type of sensor. Traditionally, those areas are hit with the shank of the stick with a harder velocity. Not many drummer hit those areas lightly (they do in many forms of jazz, but most do not play that style).   

Let us know what you come up with.
For more edrum info, be sure to visit my web site at:
          www.HellfireDrums.com                    
My current set-up:  Alesis DM10 and Trigger I/O with modified & DIY pads

Offline korakios

Re: Mod the switch on the cymbals?
« Reply #6 on: June 22, 2018, 08:54:44 AM »
Thanks @Hellfire :)
I never had any success on DIY switch zones , always failed after sort time .
Thatís why I plan opening the Ride , but I am afraid Iíll damage it simply by opening it.

The only post I found was
http://www.alesisdrummer.com/index.php?topic=5777.0
which is excellent, but doesnít mention how to open the cymbal or if there are any tricky things to avoid .

Well ,if I make any progress Iíll post here

Offline AlanK

Re: Mod the switch on the cymbals?
« Reply #7 on: June 22, 2018, 09:46:29 AM »
hi Korakios, Hellfire said it all

I feel like I've read other topics here in the past discussing how to get into these cymbals.. maybe it wasn't always a ride, but they're the same for accessing the internals (except ride has 3 zones so extra sensor and cabling).

When I first got my DM10 the bell was difficult to trigger, had to hit it really hard and spot on to get a good sound

Then after spending a few months with my kit I realized that I was trying to hit it with the tip most of the time, not the shank of the stick (I'd been out of drumming for about 25 yrs so kinda forgot some technique)

Next I cranked up the sensitivity of the bell (can be a bit confusing in the module to get to the bell settings instead of the bow). With that up higher and hitting it on one of the sides of the bell with the shank with enough force I'm getting good sound every time. But sometimes I do take it down soft and quiet but still using the shank I can get more subdued tones, or hitting with the tip but a bit harder than I would with the shank, I can usually trigger it even if I hit tip to the front of the bell.

But best results will always be shank to the side of the bell with a good solid force. I think if you open it up and try to mod it you may end up worse off, but I'm all for trying things like that out just make sure you either have another as a backup if it's destroyed, or can afford a new one (I've bought the ride for about $130 CDN).

Still would recommend upping the sensitivity, perhaps trying various threshold settings (maybe it has trouble triggering quickly one after another).

Good luck and keep us posted! :)
DM10X with Addictive Drums 2, Pro X hi-hat, 4 crashes, 682 white mesh cone conversion, Laurin Drums snare and kick, Mapex P710W double kick pedal, Tama saddle, Panasonic noise cancelling headphones, Behringer 8 channel USB mixer, Tascam 144MK AI, Samson Expedition Escape powered speakers

Offline korakios

Re: Mod the switch on the cymbals?
« Reply #8 on: June 22, 2018, 10:32:13 AM »
Thanks @AlanK
I was pretty sure that bell sensitivity had nothing to do with the actual sensitivity , was only for adjusting the static velocity , but Iíll try it again .

Offline AlanK

Re: Mod the switch on the cymbals?
« Reply #9 on: June 22, 2018, 02:35:28 PM »
I hope that does it for you, it did really help mine. But I've also cranked up the ride bow sensitivity (or volume) at times and had it way too loud, hit it just a bit too hard and wow, its the loudest crash in my kit! lol
DM10X with Addictive Drums 2, Pro X hi-hat, 4 crashes, 682 white mesh cone conversion, Laurin Drums snare and kick, Mapex P710W double kick pedal, Tama saddle, Panasonic noise cancelling headphones, Behringer 8 channel USB mixer, Tascam 144MK AI, Samson Expedition Escape powered speakers