Author Topic: Understanding dual-zone drum pads...  (Read 5096 times)

Understanding dual-zone drum pads...
« on: January 31, 2014, 03:06:36 PM »
For some reason, I was under the impression that on any Alesis kit with a dual-zone drum pad, you can (by default) trigger different sounds on the rim vs. the head.

But now I get the impression that every dual-zone pad requires TWO cables coming from that pad...as well as TWO physically separate inputs on the drum module.

Is my understanding correct?

If so...then what can you do with a DM8 Pro kit? (Because all trigger cables go into the same ribbon cable input on the DM8 module.)

And even on the DM10 kits...do you have to have 10 physically separate inputs on the module to trigger different rim/head sounds on the snare and 4 toms?

If my understanding is correct, then this is kind of a drag---because it would mean that neither the DM8 Pro, the DM10 Studio, nor the DM10X has enough physical inputs to accommodate every zone on all the pads, right? (Is this why people get multiple modules?)

Scott

Re: Understanding dual-zone drum pads...
« Reply #1 on: January 31, 2014, 03:11:49 PM »
I guess I partially answered my own question by downloading the DM10 manual, where it says...
Quote
Please note that dual-zone pads or
cymbals (e.g., a drum with head and rim triggers or a cymbal with
bow and bell sounds) will require TRS cables to trigger both
zones.

So now what i'm wondering is...what's the point in selling a digital drumkit that requires (in the case of the DM10) at least 17 physical trigger inputs to use ALL the triggers on the kit...but only giving you 12 inputs on the module?  :P

And is this pretty much normal for all digital drumkits? (Even the high-end Roland kits?)

I'm asking all this so I can figure out whether I'll have to buy a second module? (If so, can you "gang" Alesis modules? Could I buy a DM8 module, for example, and "slave it" to the DM10? Or is everything 100% physically separate?

Scott
« Last Edit: January 31, 2014, 03:13:33 PM by SWriverstone »

Offline Trondster

Re: Understanding dual-zone drum pads...
« Reply #2 on: January 31, 2014, 03:24:52 PM »
You use "stereo" TRS cables with two zones in the same cable. Just like your headphones. Most DM10 inputs are TRS, save the hi-hat and hi-hat control pedal. The second zone on the main crash is the choke. Two zones - one cable - one input.

You even write it above in your quote - you require (and use) "stereo" TRS (tip, ring, sleeve) to send two zones in a single cable. The single-zone inputs (the hi-hat and hi-hat control pedal) use TS cables.

The kick (and for that matter the second cymbal) is supplied with a single TS cable, but as the kick input is dual zone you could use a Y splitter to connect two single-zone drum pads into the single trigger input as the kick1 and kick2.


I use Y splitters for several pads - I have two single-zone cymbals joined with a Y splitter into the same trigger input (currently hooked up to perc3, I believe).

So, on the Dm10 studio and X you have one unused dual zone perc input and one free "slot" on both the kick and second cymbal if you use Y splitters, allowing four extra triggers even with all the supplied pads connected.
And - if there is a tom rim trigger you aren't using you could use a Y splitter to split it off to a different trigger for more pads.
« Last Edit: January 31, 2014, 03:36:00 PM by Trondster »
DM10 Pro kit with dampened rack, extra crashes, mesh heads, Gibraltar stands, P2002C and a dream cherry snare by Diamond Drums.

Re: Understanding dual-zone drum pads...
« Reply #3 on: January 31, 2014, 04:01:59 PM »
Thanks very much Trondster---and sorry to seem so ignorant about it.  :) So the DM10 kits come with TRS cables out-of-the-box, right?

I also wasn't aware until reading the module manual that you can set up velocity layers too (if I read it correctly)...so between those and different rim/head triggers, you could have a ton of sounds coming from your kit!

Knowing all this has also helped me decide on the DM10 Studio kit (although what I'd probably be happier with is the DM8 Pro kit with the DM10 module...but don't how I could get that without forking out a pile of extra money for the DM10 module?

Scott

Offline Trondster

Re: Understanding dual-zone drum pads...
« Reply #4 on: January 31, 2014, 04:16:46 PM »
Just get a Dm10 Studio and get an extra large pad or two. I went for a 13" custom snare. :)
DM10 Pro kit with dampened rack, extra crashes, mesh heads, Gibraltar stands, P2002C and a dream cherry snare by Diamond Drums.