Author Topic: Alesis DM10 Pro/Studio  (Read 6152 times)

Alesis DM10 Pro/Studio
« on: March 23, 2010, 04:44:41 PM »
I have some questions for people that own or have played the Alesis DM10 Pro or Studio.
In my country, as far as I know, there isn't any store selling these kits, so unfortunately I'm not able to test it before I order. I've played a roland td-9 KX kit and I really liked it. Regarding the feel of the pads, how different is the alesis feeling from this roland kit?
What about soundwise?

Another thing I noticed on the roland kit, when I hit the pads harder or softer, the sound reflected it. The alesis kit is also able to do that, right? I also noticed that when I played closer to the edges the sound also changed a little bit, is the Alesis kit capable of this?

The Alesis kit seems like a really good bargain, but I want to make sure that it doesn't sound or feel too artificial. I'm also planning on connecting the kit to my laptop and use a vsti when I want a more reallistic sound.

Offline H3RB

Re: Alesis DM10 Pro/Studio
« Reply #1 on: March 23, 2010, 05:37:56 PM »
the dm10 kits use mylar drum heads so they feel like acoustic drums, but you can replace them with mesh heads for more of a "roland" feel
the sounds are brilliant so good infact that im selling my dm5 after only 2 weeks so i can get the dm10 studio version (arrives in 2 weeks, yay)
the dm10 also has dynamic articulation which is a fancy term for "hit it harder it gets louder"
the dm10 can also be connected to the pc via usb or midi so that it can be used with most drum programs. you can also download new sound kits and upload them to the module

Re: Alesis DM10 Pro/Studio
« Reply #2 on: March 23, 2010, 06:47:37 PM »
Dynamic Articulation and dynamic sensitivity are two different things. Yes, the DM10 and kits are dynamically sensitive, and the DM10 actually has 40% wider dynamic range than any other module on the market.

Dynamic Articulation refers to our multi-sampling technique, in which we use samples of each instrument at different velocities, which we blend together to create an electronic instrument that changes in timbre as you play harder and softer. In the same way that a drum doesn't just change in volume as you hit it harder; its character attack, sustain, pitch, and color changes, Dynamic Articulation enables our sounds to behave the same way.
Dan Radin

Technical Support --> http://www.alesis.com/content1024
Pricing / Retailers --> http://www.alesis.com/content4894

Offline DeeDubs

Re: Alesis DM10 Pro/Studio
« Reply #3 on: March 23, 2010, 07:14:04 PM »
Dynamic Articulation and dynamic sensitivity are two different things. Yes, the DM10 and kits are dynamically sensitive, and the DM10 actually has 40% wider dynamic range than any other module on the market.

Dynamic Articulation refers to our multi-sampling technique, in which we use samples of each instrument at different velocities, which we blend together to create an electronic instrument that changes in timbre as you play harder and softer. In the same way that a drum doesn't just change in volume as you hit it harder; its character attack, sustain, pitch, and color changes, Dynamic Articulation enables our sounds to behave the same way.

Does this act like an AMG (Anti-machine gun) process?
Bashing away on: Alesis DM10 Pro Kit w/ Bluejay soundset, Yamaha DTXM12, Addictive Drums, Gibraltar Cage & old skool Ludwig Maple Kit.


Check out my silly mug with "So What" at http://www.sowhatct.com

Offline Guinness

Re: Alesis DM10 Pro/Studio
« Reply #4 on: March 23, 2010, 08:35:50 PM »
AMG?   What the heck is that?!
 
As a user, i can tell you that Dyn Articulation works.  I especially notice it on the cymbals.  Just as a real cymbal if you strike it moderately, it gives a rich full tone.  But if you strike it hard, the pitch changes (so to speak).  Just like some snares, if you hit it moderately, it sounds fine, but if you hit it hard, you get a chirp in the sound you hear.  Know what I mean?
 
The DM10 reproduces that quiet well, imo, with the cymbals, and I think the snare and toms too, but I don't notice that as much.
 

Another thing I noticed on the roland kit, when I hit the pads harder or softer, the sound reflected it. The alesis kit is also able to do that, right? I also noticed that when I played closer to the edges the sound also changed a little bit, is the Alesis kit capable of this?


If I recall correctly, the roland snare is 3 zone, so you do get rim, off center, and center hit voices.  Alesis's snare is dual zone, so you get rim and center voices.  I have my snare set to play offcenter on the rim, and center on the main.  Then, if I want rim, I change kits.
 
Hope that helps.  no doubt about it, Roland makes a great kit.  But, it's expensive as hell (and imo, overpriced).  The voices in the DM10 are very good, and with layering, you can really customize/perfect the sound you're seeking.  Further, with loadable sound sets coming, it is even more expandable.
 
BTW, Welcome to the forum, beat.

Re: Alesis DM10 Pro/Studio
« Reply #5 on: March 23, 2010, 09:24:46 PM »
Yes the Roland drum kits are really expensive, more than what I'm able to afford. The Alesis kit doesn't have to feel like a Roland one, I'm used to drumming on an acoustic drumset so if it does a good job at imitating the acoustic feeling that's fine with me.

I'm basically sold :D all that's left, is wait for the DM10 Studio to become available at online stores.

Also what do you mean by layering? What is that? Sorry but I'm a newbie in the edrums world.
« Last Edit: March 23, 2010, 10:24:21 PM by beat »

Offline Guinness

Re: Alesis DM10 Pro/Studio
« Reply #6 on: March 23, 2010, 11:11:32 PM »

Also what do you mean by layering? What is that? Sorry but I'm a newbie in the edrums world.

Layering is probably best defined on the website literature, but I'll give it a shot...  Basically, it's rather simple.  For each trigger, there's an A and B layer.  So, for the Kick for example, you could have a Tight 20" voice on layer A, and then a Big 26" on Layer B.  This could produce both a sharp thud, with an undercurrent of a long boom (depending on the levels).  But basically, both voices would trigger to provide a real deep and full kick sound.   Make sense?

Re: Alesis DM10 Pro/Studio
« Reply #7 on: March 24, 2010, 12:42:07 AM »
I use layering the most for stacking sounds, such as snare and clap or hi-hat and tambourine, for example. You can also assign the different layers to a velocity switch, so, for example, at low volumes, you have a boomy, open, ambient kick sound, but when you lay into it, you get an attack-oriented pop sound.

Hope this helps.
Dan Radin

Technical Support --> http://www.alesis.com/content1024
Pricing / Retailers --> http://www.alesis.com/content4894

Re: Alesis DM10 Pro/Studio
« Reply #8 on: March 24, 2010, 12:47:06 AM »
Dynamic Articulation and dynamic sensitivity are two different things. Yes, the DM10 and kits are dynamically sensitive, and the DM10 actually has 40% wider dynamic range than any other module on the market.

Dynamic Articulation refers to our multi-sampling technique, in which we use samples of each instrument at different velocities, which we blend together to create an electronic instrument that changes in timbre as you play harder and softer. In the same way that a drum doesn't just change in volume as you hit it harder; its character attack, sustain, pitch, and color changes, Dynamic Articulation enables our sounds to behave the same way.

Does this act like an AMG (Anti-machine gun) process?

To some degree, but that's not really the primary way we accomplish it. The DM10 has a "round robin" process on all sounds, which is two slightly different versions of the same sample. Each time you trigger a sound in the same place, at the same velocity, all other parameters the same, the DM10 switches from version A to version B of the sound. That way there's no machine-gun effect.
Dan Radin

Technical Support --> http://www.alesis.com/content1024
Pricing / Retailers --> http://www.alesis.com/content4894

Offline Guinness

Re: Alesis DM10 Pro/Studio
« Reply #9 on: March 24, 2010, 01:03:33 AM »
I use layering the most for stacking sounds, such as snare and clap or hi-hat and tambourine, for example. You can also assign the different layers to a velocity switch, so, for example, at low volumes, you have a boomy, open, ambient kick sound, but when you lay into it, you get an attack-oriented pop sound.

Hope this helps.

That helps me!  :)   I've been wanting to get my snare on my custom kit to be off center on soft strikes, and then full chirpy snare on a full strike.  I can do that with Layering at different velocities.  Cool!  I gotta mess with that!!!  :D
 
 

Offline DeeDubs

Re: Alesis DM10 Pro/Studio
« Reply #10 on: March 24, 2010, 11:05:04 AM »
Awesome! Glad to hear that the DM10 uses round-robin. The 'machine gun' sound on rolls are a pet peeve of mine, and keep edrums sounding like the ones back in the 80's.

Speaking of the 80's.. Rick Allen (Def Leppard) got that larger than life drum sound from layering. Sounds like Alesis is bringin PHAT back..  ;D


In other news, because of all of you on this forum (IT'S ALL YOUR FAULT),  I'm taking the plunge - I ordered a dm10 pro and hopefully will have it by the weekend (muhahaha).

BTW has anyone seen my post on gig bags? I have a gig on Good Friday ;)
Bashing away on: Alesis DM10 Pro Kit w/ Bluejay soundset, Yamaha DTXM12, Addictive Drums, Gibraltar Cage & old skool Ludwig Maple Kit.


Check out my silly mug with "So What" at http://www.sowhatct.com