Author Topic: Yamaha DTX900 Series  (Read 7289 times)

Yamaha DTX900 Series
« on: December 21, 2009, 11:30:36 PM »
Seems in the past few days Yamaha released their new top end module along with new pad technology.

DTX900 (supercedes DTXtreme III)
DTX950 (superceded DTXtreme III Special)

Videos!

Offline Hellfire

Re: Yamaha DTX900 Series
« Reply #1 on: December 22, 2009, 12:10:17 AM »
Seems in the past few days Yamaha released their new top end module along with new pad technology.

DTX900 (supercedes DTXtreme III)
DTX950 (superceded DTXtreme III Special)

Videos!
Yes they did. I think they look pretty darn good too! As soon as my local Guitar Center gets them in, I'm definitely going to the store to try them out. Won't be buying however. Too much for my blood (plus I'm still unlocking what I can do with my DM10  ;D).
For more edrum info, be sure to visit my web site at:
          www.HellfireDrums.com                    
My current set-up:  Alesis DM10 and Trigger I/O with modified & DIY pads

Re: Yamaha DTX900 Series
« Reply #2 on: December 22, 2009, 12:47:08 AM »
Seems in the past few days Yamaha released their new top end module along with new pad technology.

DTX900 (supercedes DTXtreme III)
DTX950 (superceded DTXtreme III Special)

Videos!
Yes they did. I think they look pretty darn good too! As soon as my local Guitar Center gets them in, I'm definitely going to the store to try them out. Won't be buying however. Too much for my blood (plus I'm still unlocking what I can do with my DM10  ;D).

Yep. Still very happy with my DTXpress IV purchase as well - the only thing that'd ruin my day would be seeing the Xtreme III's popping up second hand in a similar price range to what I paid for a new Xpress.

It's interesting that like Roland Yamaha have decided to keep basically the same module and just tweek slightly under the hood and give it a new look. Fortunately for DTXtreme III users a firmware update will be available that will effectively make it equivalent to a DTX900 - adding pad compatibility and some other tweaks.

Offline Hellfire

Re: Yamaha DTX900 Series
« Reply #3 on: December 22, 2009, 09:11:34 AM »
Seems in the past few days Yamaha released their new top end module along with new pad technology.

DTX900 (supercedes DTXtreme III)
DTX950 (superceded DTXtreme III Special)

Videos!
Yes they did. I think they look pretty darn good too! As soon as my local Guitar Center gets them in, I'm definitely going to the store to try them out. Won't be buying however. Too much for my blood (plus I'm still unlocking what I can do with my DM10  ;D).

Yep. Still very happy with my DTXpress IV purchase as well - the only thing that'd ruin my day would be seeing the Xtreme III's popping up second hand in a similar price range to what I paid for a new Xpress.

I wouldn't worry about that. I don't think that is going to happen. I would like to point out that there is talk over at DTXperience that there should be an announcement regarding their DTXPRESS line sometime in the near future too. I think they will be incorporating there new pads into the kit.

It's interesting that like Roland Yamaha have decided to keep basically the same module and just tweek slightly under the hood and give it a new look. Fortunately for DTXtreme III users a firmware update will be available that will effectively make it equivalent to a DTX900 - adding pad compatibility and some other tweaks.
Yep, I noticed that to. I even made a comment over at eDf about the same thing. I think it is a win for current owners however. They will be able to upgrade their pads and upgrade the firmware of their modules and basically have a new kit.
For more edrum info, be sure to visit my web site at:
          www.HellfireDrums.com                    
My current set-up:  Alesis DM10 and Trigger I/O with modified & DIY pads

Re: Yamaha DTX900 Series
« Reply #4 on: December 22, 2009, 05:26:52 PM »
is this still a reflection plate design phil? or is it a whole new concept with the silicon cell?
the process of a thought is only stirred on by creative ingenuity

Re: Yamaha DTX900 Series
« Reply #5 on: December 22, 2009, 11:19:59 PM »
I wouldn't worry about that. I don't think that is going to happen. I would like to point out that there is talk over at DTXperience that there should be an announcement regarding their DTXPRESS line sometime in the near future too. I think they will be incorporating there new pads into the kit.

Yeah... unfortunately no MIDI IN and no USB means short of sending the module back to base for a firmware update (which isn't out of the question) there's no way the new pads are going to work on the IV.

I'm thinking of expanding my pads in the near future. If I could get one of these new snares I might have considered using my TP100S as a 4th tom.

At a minimum though the new pads and the Xtreme firmware update should mean at a minimum plenty of the Xtreme III pads finding their way onto Ebay as people upgrade.

Offline Hellfire

Re: Yamaha DTX900 Series
« Reply #6 on: December 22, 2009, 11:48:16 PM »
is this still a reflection plate design phil? or is it a whole new concept with the silicon cell?
Yes, solid surface pads (rubber, silicone and base on the video cut away I saw) are still a types of reflection plate. They are the original type of reflection plate triggers actually. I know the silicone (not silicon, silicon is what they make computer chips out of) pads are going to feel great. I know because of the the experiments I did over the summer with silicone oven mitts.
For more edrum info, be sure to visit my web site at:
          www.HellfireDrums.com                    
My current set-up:  Alesis DM10 and Trigger I/O with modified & DIY pads

Offline goony

Re: Yamaha DTX900 Series
« Reply #7 on: December 23, 2009, 05:36:42 AM »
I am hoping that Yamaha do release details on a mid price point kit, similar price point to TD9 ish, as the current DTXpress not quite upto it, in my view.
KIT: Roland TD9s
Online Browser Game Desert Ops
http://uk.desert-operations.com/?recruiter=275

Re: Yamaha DTX900 Series
« Reply #8 on: December 23, 2009, 06:10:16 PM »
I am hoping that Yamaha do release details on a mid price point kit, similar price point to TD9 ish, as the current DTXpress not quite upto it, in my view.

TD9 (not SX - $1499.97@Sweetwater lists $1999.00):
2 zone snare
3 x 2 zone toms
kick
2 zone hihat
2 zone ride
2 zone crash

+

additional zone for ride
2 zone crash
2 zone aux

= 15 trigger zones (+ additional 5 with expansion) = 20 trigger zones

DTXpress IV Special ($1299.99@Sweetwater lists $1949.99):
3 zone snare
3 x single zone toms
kick
2 zone hihat
3 zone crash
single zone crash
3 zone ride

+

3 aux trigger inputs

= 16 (+ 3 pads with expansion) = 19 trigger zones

It's really a matter of taste whether you prefer the Yamaha sampling approach over the Roland Sampling/COSM approach, and then whether you like having Roland's entry level mesh snare over Yamaha's top end gum rubber snare. Yamaha cymbals are an easy win IMO, and while you can update the TD9 to a VH11 at considerable expense the XPress IV has RHH135 out of the box.

I think they come fairly close to eachother and it comes mostly down to preference. The all mesh TD9 would win hands down - but that's another US$1200 and you still don't have the VH11.

Re: Yamaha DTX900 Series
« Reply #9 on: December 23, 2009, 09:12:54 PM »
is this still a reflection plate design phil? or is it a whole new concept with the silicon cell?
Yes, solid surface pads (rubber, silicone and base on the video cut away I saw) are still a types of reflection plate. They are the original type of reflection plate triggers actually. I know the silicone (not silicon, silicon is what they make computer chips out of) pads are going to feel great. I know because of the the experiments I did over the summer with silicone oven mitts.
now from what i looked for on the net the oven mitts are a silicone gel much like a breast implant could a foam be used i found several possibilities for foam and sponge but as you said there is a price curve to it i found a 36" x 36" sheet of silicone rubber sponge for $170 which would do a few pads i might try a smaller piece for use on the bass drum as a test (btw phil i got my shells rolled and the rest of the materials on the way i should have the finished product the 2nd week of january im excited to play them ) theres another material i seen that gave me a idea its called elephant bark i got tons at work imm try it out see where it goes.
« Last Edit: December 23, 2009, 09:14:27 PM by WOUND4SOUND »
the process of a thought is only stirred on by creative ingenuity

Offline Hellfire

Re: Yamaha DTX900 Series
« Reply #10 on: December 23, 2009, 11:02:34 PM »
is this still a reflection plate design phil? or is it a whole new concept with the silicon cell?
Yes, solid surface pads (rubber, silicone and base on the video cut away I saw) are still a types of reflection plate. They are the original type of reflection plate triggers actually. I know the silicone (not silicon, silicon is what they make computer chips out of) pads are going to feel great. I know because of the the experiments I did over the summer with silicone oven mitts.
now from what i looked for on the net the oven mitts are a silicone gel much like a breast implant could a foam be used i found several possibilities for foam and sponge but as you said there is a price curve to it i found a 36" x 36" sheet of silicone rubber sponge for $170 which would do a few pads i might try a smaller piece for use on the bass drum as a test (btw phil i got my shells rolled and the rest of the materials on the way i should have the finished product the 2nd week of january im excited to play them ) theres another material i seen that gave me a idea its called elephant bark i got tons at work imm try it out see where it goes.
The silicone I used was cast silicone. Not gel. Gel will do you no good. a silicone sponge should work (heck that's what the new Yamaha's are made of, just very controlled air pockets) but, how thick is it? What is it density? I would think you need at least 3/8" to 1/2" thick minimum. Density is going to be a trial and error thing. Let us know what you come up with.
For more edrum info, be sure to visit my web site at:
          www.HellfireDrums.com                    
My current set-up:  Alesis DM10 and Trigger I/O with modified & DIY pads

Offline goony

Re: Yamaha DTX900 Series
« Reply #11 on: December 24, 2009, 04:44:20 AM »
I am hoping that Yamaha do release details on a mid price point kit, similar price point to TD9 ish, as the current DTXpress not quite upto it, in my view.

TD9 (not SX - $1499.97@Sweetwater lists $1999.00):
2 zone snare
3 x 2 zone toms
kick
2 zone hihat
2 zone ride
2 zone crash

+

additional zone for ride
2 zone crash
2 zone aux

= 15 trigger zones (+ additional 5 with expansion) = 20 trigger zones

DTXpress IV Special ($1299.99@Sweetwater lists $1949.99):
3 zone snare
3 x single zone toms
kick
2 zone hihat
3 zone crash
single zone crash
3 zone ride

+

3 aux trigger inputs

= 16 (+ 3 pads with expansion) = 19 trigger zones

It's really a matter of taste whether you prefer the Yamaha sampling approach over the Roland Sampling/COSM approach, and then whether you like having Roland's entry level mesh snare over Yamaha's top end gum rubber snare. Yamaha cymbals are an easy win IMO, and while you can update the TD9 to a VH11 at considerable expense the XPress IV has RHH135 out of the box.

I think they come fairly close to eachother and it comes mostly down to preference. The all mesh TD9 would win hands down - but that's another US$1200 and you still don't have the VH11.

personally not that close, as the TD9 has dual triggers across all pads, even on the non mesh kit.
KIT: Roland TD9s
Online Browser Game Desert Ops
http://uk.desert-operations.com/?recruiter=275

Re: Yamaha DTX900 Series
« Reply #12 on: December 24, 2009, 09:06:01 AM »
is this still a reflection plate design phil? or is it a whole new concept with the silicon cell?
Yes, solid surface pads (rubber, silicone and base on the video cut away I saw) are still a types of reflection plate. They are the original type of reflection plate triggers actually. I know the silicone (not silicon, silicon is what they make computer chips out of) pads are going to feel great. I know because of the the experiments I did over the summer with silicone oven mitts.
now from what i looked for on the net the oven mitts are a silicone gel much like a breast implant could a foam be used i found several possibilities for foam and sponge but as you said there is a price curve to it i found a 36" x 36" sheet of silicone rubber sponge for $170 which would do a few pads i might try a smaller piece for use on the bass drum as a test (btw phil i got my shells rolled and the rest of the materials on the way i should have the finished product the 2nd week of january im excited to play them ) theres another material i seen that gave me a idea its called elephant bark i got tons at work imm try it out see where it goes.
The silicone I used was cast silicone. Not gel. Gel will do you no good. a silicone sponge should work (heck that's what the new Yamaha's are made of, just very controlled air pockets) but, how thick is it? What is it density? I would think you need at least 3/8" to 1/2" thick minimum. Density is going to be a trial and error thing. Let us know what you come up with.
it comes in many thicknesses 1/32 to 3/4 of a inch it has a durometer of 30 to 70 there are a few different types but the one im looking at has a property of  vibration absortion or transfer which would trigger the reflection plate design now i use a form of this type for the boiler so i can test it  free i believe its a 1/4 inch thick  it is exposed to high heat and pressure and maintains its form ive used it for a few years i think it would hold up well to the pads. going to thick might prevent proper triggering and make the playability suffer its a very dense matieral so i think 1/9 to a 1/4 would be perfect illl get back to you on my findings phil
the process of a thought is only stirred on by creative ingenuity

Re: Yamaha DTX900 Series
« Reply #13 on: December 28, 2009, 09:05:07 PM »

<<< STUFF >>>


personally not that close, as the TD9 has dual triggers across all pads, even on the non mesh kit.

Yes... I realise that. But as you can see by my feature summary the total number of trigger zones is still only 20 on the Roland vs. 19 on the Yamaha. As a VST user most of my cymbals on SD2.2 (apart from rides and hats) only have edge samples anyway, so a bow zone is redundant for me (I use my ride edge for instance to trigger a china while my 3 zone crash acts as a second ride on bell and bow). I am mainly interested in the number of possible zones, and that number is very close.

The Yammy cymbals feel better than the CY8s that come stock on the rubber TD9, and again I'll mention the RHH135. For me the Yammy won in the end - and I was actually going out intending to buy a TD9. If the extra dollars justified the 'extra features' perhaps I might have... but to me they did not.

Still... each to their own.

In other news... someone teach me to play drums properly... I has teh tennis elbow. ;)