Author Topic: Roland D-Flux  (Read 93 times)

Offline ChrisK

Roland D-Flux
« on: October 19, 2022, 08:49:15 AM »
The 50th Anniversary Concept Model
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cPlrm4qlb28&feature=emb_logo

https://articles.roland.com/redefining-rhythm-a-history-of-roland-drums/

The Roland company?s classic slogan is ?We design the future.? Indeed, 2015?s hybrid El Cajon and the VAD lineup blur the line between tradition and innovation. Much like these, the conceptual 50th anniversary model expands notions of drums and drumming.
The kit cuts a dramatic figure. There are two color schemes: A simple and modern white and chrome version and a black version with attention-grabbing red highlights. The shape of the pads is also unusual. Triangular with cut vertices, they recall the clean, geometric lines of the original triangular Alpha Drums but with blunted edges. It?s futuristic but linked to the recent past?a 21st-century upgrade of a classic design. The 50th anniversary concept model can create many sounds from a single pad. These include pitched chromatic tones, chords, and long bass notes, with filters that modulate with the beat.
Project D-Flux

As the attention-grabbing polyhedral shape and Latin name suggest, Alpha Drums were the inspiration behind D-Flux. This time, Roland upgraded the design with mesh pads, a technology that didn?t exist in 1985. The kit takes a cue from the second-generation PD-31 and includes multiple sounds on a single pad. Each pad can hold three tones, arranged individually around the edge and mixed in the middle to allow stacking or triad chords. Additionally, users can arrange three additional sounds around the rim. Technology developed for the V-Drums and Taiko-1 contribute to the new pads.
Yusuke Tanakadate, who developed the pad for this concept model, explains: ?We call this 50th anniversary concept model project D-Flux. The d comes from Delta and represents the shape of the pad and its association with the original α drum. It is also the D in the word drum. For the concept model, we combined it with the word flux, which means flow, because we wanted to create a new change.?


"The D-Flux concept model can create many sounds from a single pad. These include pitched chromatic tones, chords, and long bass notes, with filters that modulate with the beat. "

?As a premise, we developed this concept model to be an electronic multi-purpose percussion instrument. It?s not only for use with drums but with multi-purpose instruments,? explains Yusuke Tanakadate, creator of the D-Flux concept model?s pads. ?Drummers and percussionists can use it alone or combine it with other instruments like hybrid drums and percussion,? he adds. ?It?s also intended for DJs and producers to use in various ways, such as during performances.?

Although it started with the goal of creating an unusually shaped drum that was comfortable to play, the idea expanded. ?By digging deep into applications and playing methods, we created this concept model, a unique evolutionary direction for electronic instruments,? Tanakadate says.
D-Flux Belt Kick

The kit?s unique kick utilizes two beaters and two belts instead of traditional mesh pads and a rubber striking surface. Kiyoshi Yoshino illustrates how the Belt Kick works. ?The beater on the kick pedal hits a small surface, but the tension of the large head is ideal for the gentle bounce of the acoustic kick. However, you need a large body and can only produce the same sound even though you are playing with two beaters with twin pedals. The two beaters can be played independently, and two belts are excellent for reproducing the tension of the large head.?


"We believe the D-Flux concept model has a presence that is as strong as acoustic drums or other instruments."
Yusuke Tanakadate​


A Strong Presence

Yoshino also continued on the merits of this quirky belt striking surface. ?Since the beater is directly deformed in response to the beater being held down, we have made it possible to perform an ?open/close playing method? in which the beater is immediately released or held down by detecting it with a sensor,? he says, ?and an epoch-making after-touch performance in which the sound is extended while the beater is held down and the tone is changed by stepping further.?
Aside from its technical merits, the Belt Kick packs a visual punch. Although compact, it functions as the center of the kit. ?The design has a strong presence while emphasizing the basic skeleton of the Belt Kick,? Tanakadate stresses. ?We believe the D-Flux concept model has a presence that is as strong as acoustic drums or other instruments.?​


Into the Future

With D-Flux, Roland is pointing toward the next stage of its drum development. These are drums?but from an entirely new paradigm. D-Flux will soon embark on a global tour where drummers will have a chance to experience it.


Offline Hellfire

Re: Roland D-Flux
« Reply #1 on: October 19, 2022, 03:16:19 PM »
Thanks for posting ChrisK.

I personally think its really cool, but the average edrummer will not. Almost every edrummer today is consumed with Acoustic Emulation. Meaning they want it to only sound acoustic, look acoustic and only function exactly like an acoustic drum set. Anything outside of that thought is looked down on.

How do I know this? Simmons was trying something similar (not exactly, but in the same ball park) with the SD2000 kit. The hex design of the kit would have allowed seven independent zones eventually (center and each side). No the SD2000 did not have seven zone pads at release but, it did have the ability to use three zone pads (Snare & Ride with one cable similar to Yamaha) and had the kit been a little more popular, I'm sure you would have seen more zones on future versions. And of course what happened? The biggest complaint was the hex design. Everyone wanted it to look acoustic. Where's the drum shell?

I bet someone in the edrum community right now is looking at this new tech (based on a look from the past) and is saying, "now if only Roland would put that tech in a drum shell"::)
« Last Edit: October 19, 2022, 03:18:09 PM by Hellfire »
For more edrum info, be sure to visit my web site at:
          www.HellfireDrums.com                    
My current set-up:  Alesis DM10 and Trigger I/O with modified & DIY pads

Offline ChrisK

Re: Roland D-Flux
« Reply #2 on: October 19, 2022, 04:29:47 PM »
False Alarm: Just learned D-Flux are not for sale, only 4 made for marketing for now, probably they want to study the market demand.

Offline Hellfire

Re: Roland D-Flux
« Reply #3 on: October 20, 2022, 08:06:40 AM »
False Alarm: Just learned D-Flux are not for sale, only 4 made for marketing for now, probably they want to study the market demand.

I didn't think they were going to be for sale to the general public. The last line in the article you posted states:

"D-Flux will soon embark on a global tour where drummers will have a chance to experience it."

I took that to mean Roland is test marketing the idea. And they will find that most edrummers will think the tech is really cool, but want it in a traditional looking style and not the new wave future look of the 1980's.

Actually, I think edrummers will like the idea of colored mesh heads the I think the kick trigger tech (which isn't all that new meaning the belt idea. I was playing with that idea myself ten + years ago) will have the biggest impact.
« Last Edit: October 20, 2022, 08:09:49 AM by Hellfire »
For more edrum info, be sure to visit my web site at:
          www.HellfireDrums.com                    
My current set-up:  Alesis DM10 and Trigger I/O with modified & DIY pads

Re: Roland D-Flux
« Reply #4 on: October 20, 2022, 07:28:24 PM »
False Alarm: Just learned D-Flux are not for sale, only 4 made for marketing for now, probably they want to study the market demand.

I didn't think they were going to be for sale to the general public. The last line in the article you posted states:

"D-Flux will soon embark on a global tour where drummers will have a chance to experience it."


I took that to mean Roland is test marketing the idea. And they will find that most edrummers will think the tech is really cool, but want it in a traditional looking style and not the new wave future look of the 1980's.

Actually, I think edrummers will like the idea of colored mesh heads the I think the kick trigger tech (which isn't all that new meaning the belt idea. I was playing with that idea myself ten + years ago) will have the biggest impact.


Personally I really like the D-Flux with their pads who have new wave futuristic look of 1980,  I really hope Roland will sell this drum soon!! And yes, I have the older version, PD-31 Pads!!
« Last Edit: October 20, 2022, 07:30:26 PM by Mikevdrums »